Review: What Was Mine by Helen Klein Ross

What Was Mine by Helen Klein Ross

In What Was Mine Lucy Wakefield, desperate to have a baby, steals one from an Ikea. Twenty-one years later, she is finally discovered. This book is written in flash back, kind of, so at the beginning the reader knows that Lucy has been caught but then gets the story from her perspective and others – including her ex-husband, the baby’s mother, and the baby herself.

This book was an easy read, and I enjoyed it, but it’s nothing amazing. I think a big part of that was that the ending was known. The interesting part of this book was hearing each character’s version of the story. I found myself sympathizing with both Lucy and the birth mother (Meredith? I want to say). Of course the true victim of the whole thing is the baby – Mia. I enjoyed reading about her reconnecting with her original family.

If you like emotional family dramas, you may enjoy this one. I wanted to like it more, and there wasn’t really anything bad about it, but it just didn’t blow me away.

Rating: 3 Stars

What Was Mine
Helen Klein Ross
Fiction
Gallery Books
January 5, 2016
Paperback
336

Simply told but deeply affecting, in the bestselling tradition of Alice McDermott and Tom Perrotta, this urgent novel unravels the heartrending yet unsentimental tale of a woman who kidnaps a baby in a superstore and gets away with it for twenty-one years.

Lucy Wakefield is a seemingly ordinary woman who does something extraordinary in a desperate moment: she takes a baby girl from a shopping cart and raises her as her own. It's a secret she manages to keep for over two decades from her daughter, the babysitter who helped raise her, family, coworkers, and friends.

When Lucy's now-grown daughter Mia discovers the devastating truth of her origins, she is overwhelmed by confusion and anger and determines not to speak again to the mother who raised her. She reaches out to her birth mother for a tearful reunion, and Lucy is forced to flee to China to avoid prosecution. What follows is a ripple effect that alters the lives of many and challenges our understanding of the very meaning of motherhood.

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge